Skip to main content

About your Search

English 63
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
much time worrying about the next election and not the generation. the solution to that is ultimately what was envisioned by our founders. and what jack kennedy understood as well. and that's the american people. we go through these periods where our politics gets all bollucks up. the truth is when you look at our history, there's been a lot of times where congress gets stuck. but the reason we get through it is the american people have good instincts. if over and over again they see we're not addressing the core problems we have, eventually they will put in place folks who are serious about getting the work done. >> let's talk about the problem with the legislative branch. the other day speaker boehner said that we can't get anything done because we have a divided country, a divided congress. but that's the nature of america. they have an aisle down the middle of the senate. an aisle down the middle of the house. they've always been there. we've rarely had one party in power for more than a year or two. so we stuck with this as long as we have two parties running our government, they
a democratic elected governor. how would you assess this week's signups, increased substantially. there seems to be a lot of interesting with a lot of people going to the sites. how would you assess this now that we're at the end of the week? >> i mean, it's been a great week for the aca, there's no question about it. the kinks appear to be out. we're not quite sure about the back end, but i think it looks pretty good. the kinks seem to be out of the system. more and more people driven to it. more and more people are signing up. and the sad part for the republicans is it's only going to get worse for them. it's only going to get better. as the kinks are totally smoothed out of the system, people will find this bill, they'll find it's like heaven. and for other people they're going to find they've got better plans and they've got the freedom to choose and they can compare and they can shop which we never had the ability to do in america. i think it's going to be more successful each month it passes. so the republicans better find another horse to ride, because they can't ride this one. >> you
town hall meetings for the midterm elections in 2010. and so you allow people to organize and get these groups out there, that were there to just obstruct. what you need to do is do small group meetings. start with your base, start with women's organizations and use your best weapon. michelle obama. >> i love that. stick with me, because we'll have robert gibbs when we come back, and i want to ask about who would be the effective surrogates here. i love the idea of first lady obama out there sort of selling this law, but i wonder if there are some real challenges in making that happen. stick with us, we are bringing robert gibbs into the discussion next. when it's donut friday at the office, i use my citi thankyou card to get 2x the points at the coffee shop. which will help me get to a beach in miami and they'll be stuck at the cube farm. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points dining out, with no annual fee. go to she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a
will play big in the 2014 elections i just think is making it up. i don't think we have any idea how this issue is going play in the 2014 elections. >> david made a big prediction this weekend. let's listen to this. >> there is a huge interest out there. by the end of march, most people think you could have six, seven, eight million people registered for health care. >> only if there is a rapid increase. >> but you see the interest out there. people want health care. they're going to be able to get health care. if the website is working. and to your question, we live in a social world right now. people will tell their siblings or talk to their brothers and sisters. i think what you're beginning to see is it is an easy experience. >> was that an evidence based statement? >> there is some evidence behind it. if you look at every past expansion like this one, medicare part d, which is the prescription drug benefit. there was very weak enrollment in the beginning. so they have got everybody in towards the end. it's a different program and different features. the natural spur would normal
, regarding elections, now alec doesn't do that, get involved in campaigns, it is actively involved in what happens to people after they get elected. you know, what happens to a state assemblyman and what laws are passed. and that is when alec gets involved. there will be more debate about it, alec is a tax-exempt charity. what it does is cook up legislation. >> if i had the choice of choosing who could be elected in a particular election or writing the laws that that person would introduce as a legislator once they were there, i know which one i would pick. thank you very much for your time, sir, fascinating. we'll be right back. [ thunder crashes ] [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit to learn your risk. i have a big meeting when we land, but i am so stuffed up, i can't rest. [ male announcer ] nyquil cold and flu liquid gels don't unstuff your nose. they don't? alka seltzer
will be the impact of obama care on the 2014 elections, and even perhaps the 2016 presidential race? >>> plus, an historic week for pope francis with his first major statement, attacking what he calls, quote, the idolatry of money. what continues is a whirlwind change for the vatican. i'll go one on one with cardinal timothy dolan of new york. he is one of the leading cardinals in america. he talks about why the church has turned against obama care and why the church has been outmarketed on gay marriage. >>> nbc correspondent harry smith with the story of the survivor of the boston marathon bombing. he represents the true meaning of boston strong. i'm david gregory onand this is "meet the press" on sunday, december 1st. >>> good sunday morning. a big weekend for the future of president obama's landmark health care legislation, two months to the day since the troubled launch of heal, they put out a report this morning saying they're making dramatic progress and the team is meeting with private sector velocity and effectiveness. that's how the website apparently is working. it al
of those problems, but when you elected phil bryant to be your governor, he stopped you from fixing those problems. you could have done it. you were doing it, and he stopped you. mississippi, you could have been kentucky, but you are staying mississippi. it is now december. happy december. that means the sign-up exchanges for health insurance have been under way for two months now, two months and one day. month two, turns out, went much, much better than month one did, went like four times better. that's the same pattern that we saw in massachusetts six years ago when we essentially piloted this same policy for the nation under romney care in massachuset massachusetts. after a terrible first few weeks on the federal website, the obama administration now says the site is working for most people most of the time, which is what they were hoping for by december 1. if the health care website is, in fact, working that much more smoothly, that should musmooth e way for more people to get enrolled across the country. in the first nine weeks, in general, states running their own exc
of people elected. >> i think john boehner who i know and like would retract those comments. i hope he would. i'll put in a different perspective. they are right where they were a few months back. democrats wanting more revenue, republicans wanting some cuts in entitlements. now, i'm not that bright and neither is my 3-year-old dog. it suggests to me the only way we're going to get a deal is if some people are willing to give. there is common ground. the president is willing to recalculate benefits under social security, formula for those calculations early in the year. paul ryan agrees with that. the president also said he's willing to look at medicare premiums for those that earn more. ryan says he agrees to that. i don't understand why adults can't come into the room -- this is not placing -- i think republicans are at blame but at some level this impasses, we have a subsenate, we all have to give a little bit here. if not the sequestration cuts will take effect in january. as much as some people don't like them, the sky didn't fall in when they happened at the beginning of this year. i d
're just going to dump on this for the next couple elections. that's all we have to do. but there might be a smaller break out of republicans who say, you know what? i've got a responsibility to my constituents at home to make this thing better. it's going to be here. it's going to be here as long as we live. it'll be here forever, perhaps. but i'm going to make it better. there's a couple tweaks i know about. maybe i heard it from jack cason or someone i look more positively toward on the republican side. >> you're hearing some people speak in those terms, chris. let's face it. it's still a fact that obama and obama care are the two words that really unify republicans across their factional lines and they're not going to give up on it very quickly. and the minute they come up with a positive suggestion of which there are several floating around paul ryan and others have had a free market oriented alternatives. but they are not popular. even among republicans. they can't build a consensus around them. we debated proposals during the last presidential election, you'll remember. no vouche
way and thinking about re-election. that's not going to be repeated. the emerging markets are in difficulties, as i say, and the result is that german exports at the moment are up from just before the crisis because of exports to emerging markets. so the german export machine is now having difficulties but the emerging markets are in difficulties. >> charles will pick up on this point in just a bit. charles dumas, the chairman of lombard street is staying with us. this is how we're shaping up across european markets this morning. a bit of a mix between the red and the green, but on balance, the gainers have it. we're up about 0.3% on the stoxx europe 600. the german market has been one of the better performers this morning. still a gap to close as we close out the month of november. but nonetheless, the move has been a push higher on the top performance has been the likes of infineon. as we move on to some of the other markets, zurich, we've got some selling in shividon. nestle is under pressure. across the board on balance, you can see on these indices, the xetra dax 0.5%
and the uninsured. that are eligible for the exchanges. this is like looking as election night returns five minutes after the polls 0 close. we don't know yet. >> what is interesting or what we're finding out, in a lot of states it's not just the republican governor states or republican leader states that are having the problems. in in maryland, dominated by a democratic government and legislature. it's one of the biggest problems, and that flies the the in face or of what the administration is arguing, the republican governors are trying to tear this thing apart and stop it in its tracks. >> it's too early. the results are too early. the real issue here, neil, when you look at what these people are expected to buy. young people are expected to pay 10% of their after-tax income for health insurance policy that might have a $2,000 deduct illinois and some states the deductible is up to $6,000. these people are the healthy, invincibles and not a lot of people have disposable income no matter they're age to to have to put 10% of your disposable income out for something that is a piece of paper with a
nonracial election, to elect nelson mandela, president. >> he wins them over. he seduces them. >> the book "playing the enemy" was turned in to the movie. there is no better example of how he seduced all races than the day south africa beat new zealand in the 1995 rugby world cup final. >> one common goal. >> rugby had been the white man's sport. the green jersey a symbol of apartheid for blacks. but here was south africa's first black president being cheered as he walked on to the field wearing one. >> it was a moment when all south africa crowned mandela king. to achieve that is one of the great political achievements of all time. >> he came out of prison an old man in a changed landscape, starting over. what gave him the will to become a statesman. a nobel prize winner, the friend and confidante of world leaders. the price was high, his marriage to winnie ended in divorce he was father to his country not to his own children. >> he understood that sacrifice, i think it was a great sacrifice because he truly loved children, it was something that basically was denied him for 27 years. >> l
's in charge of the republican governor's association which tries to get republicans elected. yesterday chris christie tried to set the record straight. >> mr. asterino hasn't told me or anyone else he's run for governor. i won't support someone who won't say they are running or not. it's much ado about nothing. my guess is some people, irresponsible folks who are trying touring him to run to try to create an image that, you know, i'm urging him to run. i'm not urging him to do anything. he came and asked for time specifically asked for time with me and mary, for he and his wife to meet with the two of us the impact it has on our family. they have young children like we do and that's what the whole conversation was about. when we have a republican nominee for new york then i'll support the republican nominee for new york. >> i had no idea. as he said i was at the republican governor's association. he's westchester, one 2-1 margin as a conservative in a democratic area. but everybody there knew he was running. i don't understand the confusion here. he talked to ed koch and everybody else. >> w
things they can't do. republicans win elections when the government asks them to do things they can't do. >> page three of the report it says here, the team is reacting with high pressure velocity and effectiveness. that's an acknowledgment that, you know what, this was a government operation for a long time and it failed. now we're bringing in the private sector folks. that is an indictment on the whole idea of government as a solution, frankly, when you look at this. >> and the president as a manager, and people around him who can get the bureaucracy to move in a particular direction, which is not easy, but this is your point on how nimble government is. >> the challenge is i think the goals are laudible, mayor, and it's something the president articulated brilliantly as an election and reelection mantra. but this is a tough bet, and he had a responsibility to make sure the rollout was not this disastrous in order to achieve these goals. because now they're at risk of losing the credibility of government as an agent of change. >> republicans are insist he en relentless pursuit of failu
fairness. we had an election about this. why? because we are a better country that this. joining me now is congressman, democrat from pennsylvania and the president of the center of american progress. she introduced president obama at his speech today. thank you both for being here. >> thank you for having me, reverend. >> congressman, let me go to you first. the defining challenge of our time. that's the quote from the president. isn't it something that congress has the moral duty to address? >> the congress and the country. this is the most important speech of all of the speeches in the entire career of barack obama. this is the most important speech he has given and will be recorded, i think, as so. it is also one of the most important speeches i think ever given by the american president because he really laid out that our country cannot stand with a circumstances of haves and have-nots, that we have to see things more not about charity, but he was really arguing about an enlightened self-interest on the country to educate our young people. we need to provide employment and entrepre
who need religious voters in these primaries or, you know, in national elections as well. >> well, we know it's important, but we also know the other side. that is the concern that someone would legislate based on their religion, which happens to not be the religion of the constituent in some cases. and that is the larger, i think what you were saying, the conversation is not the floating book shelf cross thing, it's a larger conversation. >> it's the content of how you legislate. >> absolutely. all right, domenico, thank you very much. greatly appreciate it. and a reminder, chris matthews has a one-on-one interview with president obama today. it's part of the "hardball" college tour live from american university. the full interview airs tonight at 7:00 eastern on "hardball." >>> still ahead, well, he's back. he never left, but anyway, toronto mayor rob ford responds to new reports that he may have tried to buy the infamous video that allegedly shows him smoking crack. the offer, according to court documents, may have been $5,000 and a car. that according to drug dealers who allegedly
elected a republican congress in the house because of obama care. we're going to basically get another shot here of winning a senate on the same issues, so three senate seats today that are open. another three or four that are vulnerable and we need to pick up six seats. if we do, the game has changed dramatically. >> this powell, 81% of respondents believe the law should be changed or repealed. let's just work with changed since that's probably easier at the moment. it's impossible for me today not to look through the lens of nelson mandela, but is there any way that the white house and republicans could ever just come together and figure out how to fix this thing? >> well, i would hope they would and certainly that is the legacy, the enduring legacy of mandela, which is compromise rising above your circumstances, but i think this president has picked a very different strategy. he is going to double down on obama care and he is going to attack the republicans and let's be clear while the democrats have huge political liabilities, the republicans have lower ratings and are seen as the
states, were walking out, and then president-elect mandela, just moments he was having brief meetings. after he met with the vice president, there were a few reporters, and he shuffled over and very quietly and shook our hands and asked how we were doing. on this days when, that's who he was, this quiet dignity and grace. i want to show this. the vips were given this. and some of us hung around. >> you were working for the associated press. >> at the time. this is the new stamp they issued that day, commemorating the new president, but there was a new national anthem, a new flag, an there's a commemorative stamp. these are the parliament buildings, i believe they're called the union buildings, and in this courtyard is where the ceremony w ld. you ha a who's who o wld balcony in the union building, and these generals in the military white dress uniforms, white men, handing over power to nelson mandela. at that moment everybody was crying, reporters, people in the stands, it was just amazing watching these white men in white dress uniforms essentially hand the power of south africa to t
, facilitating the first democratic elections and becoming first democratically elected president, first black president as well. you mentioned the 91 heads of state coming, truly is stunning when you look at not only barack obama, but a number of former presidents, george w. bush, jimmy carter and bill clinton as you mentioned. let's not forget the rest of the world is interested, prince kar charles on his way, the brazilian president and french president, u.n. secretary-general and more. as a way of facilitating this massive logistical challenge the government deployed some 11,000 troops to make sure as the interest builds it's on the fourth of the tenth day of mourning people are safe and there are no snags having so many vips here in the country. tomorrow's event, the tuesday memorial service which possibly could be attended by the u.s. president will be the first formal event, followed by nelson mandela's lying in-state at the union building in pretoria wednesday through friday. significant, john, because it was 20 years ago he was sworn in as president at that location. so a euphoric wee
gop isn't exactly wing hearts and minds. >> the election is like which party will commit suicide last. the republicans messed up with the government shutdown, now the obama website. the concern next we'll see. >> joining me political writer, "daily beast" columnist sally cohn and contributor editor wallace walls. from washington, no longer in auburn gear although i expect his team spirit is soaring former white house secretary and founding partner of the insight agency robert gibbs. robert, i'll start with you. i will use football metaphors for fans at home and fans on set. is the white house -- is are we seeing end to end a la auburn last night? is this a major play we're seeing on december 1st or are we in the middle of the field right now? >> i think the obama administration should be glad it appears to be first and ten again. it's no longer third and 35. we're a long way from 109 yard field goal return. look, i think you summed it up quite well. the users experience on the front end is greatly enhanced for most people that are using it. i never get tired of watching
, everybody believes obama care will be a center piece argument within the 2014 election. sort of a moving target. we don't know what it will signature fi because it's improving in some ways and arguments against it keep changing. if one of your colleagues, if a house dem came to you and said, what should i do here? should i run on obama care or kind of hide and move away from it, what would your advice? >> we own it but we have to be all in on improving it. i have a contrarian view, the american people know the health care debate is over, that we've got to make this work. the real issue is going to be the economy. the average wages of working americans declined in the past ten years, how do rewe restore growth in the pocket books not just in the stock market for the american people? we've got to lean in on that and start addressing the concerns of parents trying to send their kids to college, get them jobs. retirement security, these are things that have been put on the side and it's really a discredit that congress is focusing on middle class concerns. >> congressman, to that point, we'r
in america who's worked harder for his re-election or supported this bill or went out of his way to explain the bill to the american people more than idi >> that's president wolf, on health reform, obama care, and what he said, you know, created a lot of controversy. >> yeah. he obviously does support the president. hillary clinton, as you and all of our viewers know is the overwhelming democti favorite president in2016ingor what does the former president say about his wife and 2016? >> he is saying he doesn't know if she's going to run or not. >> is mrs. clinton running for president? >> i don't know. and i think and she believes that the country should spend at least another year working very hard on the problems we have. we w haveery serious challenges in america. and we have responsibilities around the world. i think it's a big mistake, you know, this constanten four-year campaign is not good for america. we nee to deal with the business we have before us. >> wolf, i did ask him ask the former president what he thought of vice president biden as a possible president in 20716. he says he
the administration now has delayed the enrollment. they say they and paneleded it until after the 2014 elections. next year people will pay much higher prices than this year. so i think long term, we submitted a plan. the president talks about a plan that he is open to plans women submitted a plan. myself, paul ryan, senator co-bush, we introduced a bill before it was introduced. >> one of the things that i think is pretty cool about this booking, i'm not just saying this. you are two of the most candid people on capitol hill and that says a lot. a lot of candid people up there. so let's just assume for the sake of argument that what you say is true and that you're going to keep believing that what you believe. but you're also a practical politician. you know in your heart of hearts that nothing is going to change as long as the president is in office, right if. >> i take president at his word. the president says we have good ideas. we single him a letter four years ago. that deal is still there. we could take our plan, let people sign up for the republican plan. let people sign up for his plan.
into 2014, the election year, do the republicans have a shot in the senate? >> i think they door, but there one more big retirement we're looking at, thad from mississippi. are there some democrats that just don't like it in the senate? you always hear mark wariner doesn't like it. there's no sign he's going to retire. does lindsey graham get all these challenges from the right? that is the decision we're trying to find out. the big takeaway, no matter what happens in 2014, the senate is getting more conservative, period. >> we'll get into a discussion on foreign policy, starting with this healafghanistan deadline. >> karzai won't sign this deal. susan rice went over to save it and she couldn't save it with the president. they're saying, what's going on? i thought you agreed to this whole deal. does the president himself have to get this done? they can't seem it get this done by the end of the year. >> here and reporting over the weekend, president rouhani in iran saying, we're going to enrich uranium. is there any reason to think that iran gives up its nuclear option? >> no. ira
for re-election and how president clinton fits into the plan. and we'll huddle around the cooler. a true sign of the season. lewis is also outdoors. barnicle and are kind of lonely. he's near the christmas tree somewhere. it's donut friday at the office. and i'm low man on the totem pole. so every friday morning they send me out to get the goods. but what they don't know is that i'm using my citi thankyou card at the coffee shop, so i get 2 times the points. and those points add up fast. so, sure, make me the grunt. 'cause i'll be using those points to help me get to a beach in miami. and allllllll the big shots will be stuck here at the cube farm. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual apply, go to [ female announcer ] let betty do the measuring and get a head start on delicious homemade cookies. visit for fun holiday ideas. betty crocker cookie mix. just pour, betty crocker cookie mix. so i trity crocker cookie mix. ed depend so i and it made the differenc
a miracle, alex. i was here 23 years ago after after madiba was released but well before he was elected president and at a time when this country was on a razor's edge. there was some violence in the townships stirred by the security forces, and one be wasn't certain which direction the country would go in. i remember when madiba went on television, compelled his brothers and sisters to make peace and reconcile themselves and to be here 23 years later to see black and white working side by side, to not only forge a democracy but a strong economy, as well is absolutely stirring and you know at this moment is possible because of the spirit nelson mandela. >> yes, he was really a man who he inspired and he really kept the country together almost as if a type of a glue, and there are worries about south africa going into a tail spin financially and even socially now that he has passed. are you at all concerned about that? >> no, i'm absolutely not, alex. i will tell you that these are resill entpeople. if you could survive the oppressive decades of apartheid and come forward as the leading
. and to celebrate the first democratic elections in south africa we were in our hotel looking over at the ceremonies in a park and flying over us were 11 jets roaring, fighter jets roaring above our heads, fanning out in vapor trails the colors of the south african flag. the jets were flown by black south african women, symbolically that caused us much celebration in our hotel. and since apartheid ended two million homes have been -- millions of homes have been built, millions of homes have been electrified in south africa, black families now have virtually tripled in the country. so nelson mandela ushered in a dramatically different kind of south africa. and we thought that it was our responsibility to play a small part in that struggle, because our country was a major part of the black communities problem in south africa. we were on the wrong side of the issue and on the wrong side of history. >> schieffer: it is story that has not yet ended and story that goes on. mr. robinson, thank you so much for being with us today. >> thank you for having me. >> schieffer: we'll be back in one minute with
's. when he got re-elected at 72 or 74, 76, something like that, there was a question when he was running is that too old? there's some senators that go to -- >> i want them to drag me out of the box. >> you're 33 years old. >> i still want them to drag me out of the box. >> they will. we don't know where you'll be by then. you're on a fast track. you are. you're a climber and you're very ambitious. >> it's hard work. >> did you see google today? >> no. >> who is this person? >> what is this? >> my computer doesn't work today. i can't see zblig she was a computer programmer. grace happa. i want to run -- happa. see her? happa. >> from the ads. >> her name is happa. >> she was a scientist. >> i never heard of her before. >> pioneer in the field. >> that doesn't mean anything. >> have you ever heard of her? >> i haven't. >> will you say that for me. >> harper. >> harper. >> when we come back, the ceo of one of the best ipos will join us on set. the stock is up 40% since may. we'll unveil the country. >>> plus, sunshine, tourism and tax breaks. florida governor rick skotd will join us on set
or inconveniently, they held it until after the 2004 election when president bush was reelected. "the times" on that story for a year is why edward snowden took his rev liegss further this year to "the guardian" in britain. today, the editor of "the guardian" has only published about 1% of what edward snowden gave them. is that decision not to publish 99% an issue of bravery, intimidation? is that judgment? they are deciding, in effect, what we get to know about what our government does based on their judgment of what counts as news. and their judgment conceivably of what harm they could cause by releasing to the public what they as a news organization are privileged to know that the rest of us to do. it is a very, very uncomfortable thing. it is part of why the job of a free and responsible press is a hard thing, a hard job, hard to do well. you want the people that do it to be worthy of the responsibility they have. tomorrow morning in a law officer in danbury, connecticut. phone calls will be made available to the phone calls made the morning of the sandy hook shootings. the victims said
there to protect the taxpayer is a lot of times the democrats that the union ves elected, anyway. so you've got no one there to protect the -- >> well, in the past when officials have not wanted to pay up for raises at the time, they say don't worry, we'll take care of you at the pension. 30 years down the road they're not necessarily going to be honored all the time. it's not just the pensioners who are going to feel pain. this is every constituency. >> in the private sectors, they know if they put their company out of business, they're going to still have a job. and cities can't believe this is happening. we would be back to where every single time they're going to think, hey, we can -- >> the rest of the nation is watching what happens in detroit. it's going to be appealed. the union ves said they're going to appeal this decision. but the judge who ruled yesterday said he will not stay his decision awaiting that appeal. when we come back, we'll talk november expectations for the adp jobs report. just by talking to a helmet. it grabbed the patient's record before we even picked him up. it fou
particularly because of the shutdown and how that hurt republicans. and it's an election year in 2014, republicans want to talk about obama care, they want to talk about other issues. they think they can beat up on obama and the democrats and don't want to get bogged down by shutdowns and debt limit fights. there's no reason to think stocks are too high because washington's going to kill everything. >> and maybe it was set so low because it was on the floor. >> you can't go much lower than they are. they can clear the bar for expectations which is no shut down. and maybe get the approval ratings in the 10% range, double digits at some point. >> one of the things we've been watching is what the fed's going to do next. how much do you think the fed has been responsible for this. and if the tapering begins, is that really something that takes the steam out of the market? not if it's just based on valuations like you've been talking. >> i have not been of the view that fed-driven liquidity is the sole support under the market. we touched on it a few minutes ago, there are many traditional
obama care. now you look at another core constituency. we heard after the election about the latino vote in america. look at the latest poll out of gallup. the support of of the president has gone down 23% among hispanic voters. that's a huge discrepancy. from where he was a year ago. >> and the reason -- now this is not obviously a good law for the american people. but politically, the reason why this is valuable is it's exposing the president for what he's about. he's all about making promises that aren't coming true. now people are getting the reality of what barack obama is about in their mailbox. the difference between this scandal and many others is this is affecting millions of people in their bank account losing their doctor, their health care. this is just the beginning. just wait until employers have the option of dumping their insurance and throwing people on these exchanges. >> let me ask you this. we know the federal renlster back in july of oh 2010. they knew the individual policies, it could be as high as 80% of americans would lose them. they also said 60 some odd percent
all the people who thought that the black people in africa who thought that as soon as he was elected, things were going to look much better. they would have houses, cars, that didn't materialize. it was a crazy system that set up before that. >> that would have taken a redistribution. >> they did exactly that. >> mandela was somebody who would personally get involved in all kinds of issues. we're going to be speak, richard branson later this morning. he received a personal phone call from mandela asking him to step in and save some jobs by investing in a company. he's going to talk to us about that. he's somebody who saw the plight, reached out on a personal level and tried to make a difference every day. >> michelle, are you coming back? >> i think so. >> because i want to ask you about the south african economy. it is a member of the g-20. it is one of the leading countries and i know guys have put money into that country who made a lot of money there. >> they're considered one of the fragile five, as we call it. so if we start to see tapering -- right. just like indonesia or india
the time mandela was released the anc was unbanned until the election. there was a negotiation process. and one of the calculations that f.w. de klerk and the national party made was that they could win the negotiation process and maintain a degree of white control for a longer period. and one of the way theys set it up was a preconstitutional negotiation that had all of the homelands there and their leaders represented, the african national congress and the others and the anc was outnumbered there. i sat in on a number of those sessions. the homeland leaders almost all went with the national party in the beginning but it was really interesting. there was a shift around '93 when the homeland base for the national party began to crumble, when it was absolutely clear that the african national congress remitted the overwhelming majority of the south african people. and the negotiations broke down to basically the two big party, the national party and the anc working things out. and f.w. de klerk and his advisers realized they wouldn't be able to bum rush some sort of mild transition. >> h
a lame duck president. i believe midterm elections, gop has a grand opportunity to reach out to those pop that have suffered the most. they can take over the house and senate if they do grassroots advocacy, if the tea party and party establishment would join as one we have a grand opportunity. >> chris, last word. >> a lot of this is going to fall on republicans come midterms, what do they want to do. for example, take immigration. if you want to address this issue and to be viable at a national level, you have to put something forward. if you're going to be basically trapped by fringe within your own party, you end up doing nothing. part of that is the reality. they have to come to the fact divisions are not -- >> senate republicans do something about immigration, chris. >> not house republicans. >> approval rate, low rate but we're out of time. angela, lame duck president has three years to go. >> i got you. >> thanks so much. >> thank you. >> we will be right back. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in
the right to work. then he led the election. he didn't just leave, circumstances change. the freedom of that change with global opinion. >> i was in college when he was freed, rick, and you have this sense, especially looking back historically, that he's released and all is well. and that was the opposite of actually what was the case. when chris hani was an anc leader, was murdered, that was a seminole moment. you talked about when then mandela goes to f.w. de klerk and says, you have to stop this or virtually everything will go off the rails. >> and he went on television in south africa that night rather than de klerk ask showed that he was the father of the nation. as you know, i was with him when his father was murdered. we were in kuno, had just taken an early morning walk, the phone rang and he picked it up and got the news. he was on the phone for about 15 minutes, his expression never changed. he put down the phone and turned to me with a little ex aspiration and said, man, where is our porridge? he was so calm in a crisis and then he rose to that. he said that was when south
not to show up. and, you know, ever since president obama has been elected, republicans liked to, as you say, push this narrative that we live in some sort of post racial society. they use it to justify their attack on voting rights. dr. dyson, anybody buying it? >> nobody is buying it, and the selling of it has been pretty poor. the reality is that the persistence of racial inequality suggests that the republicans would have to do a lot of soul searching. first of all, you can't, you know, present images of barack obama, president obama, as they have done, so viciously on the far right wing. and then the republicans have not been quick to repute pud ate that kind of thing and suggest in place of this vitriolic attention to racial matters they're willing to open up the doors, the flood gate of not only compassion, but as zerlina has indicated, of public policies that benefit and at least strengthen these african-american and latino communities. if you're not willing to deal with the issues of immigration, of affirmative action, of reform of our housing markets, then you're not really serious
on the hill, people in the white house, people-elected officials. and at a certain point, they would say, "hey, you know what congressman x? or you know what, staffer x? you're really good at this. when you're done -- have you thought about what you're going to do when you leave the hill?" and they'd say, "well, not really." or they would just sort of leave the question open. and jack abramoff said, "i knew that when i could ask that question, i owned him." because there's a pre-emptive bribe there. it's -- you know, "you're going to be making maybe a million dollars at my lobbying firm, if you answer this question correctly and you act correctly." i mean, in your office, if you can help us. if you can maintain this friendship for as long as you're in power. i mean -- when you see peter orszag going to citigroup, when you see jake seiwert going to goldman, when you see geoff morrell going to bp, it does sort of beg the question, "who were they working for when they were at the pentagon, at the omb, at the treasury department?" i mean, you just sort of wonder where their mind is. >> trent lott.
and the ship. we also need to elect leaders who are going to -- >> keep their word. >> yeah. >> your daughter is a lovely girl. >> thank you. >> i got to spend time with her earlier. you have a great doctor. i wish you and your family the best. nobody should have to go through this. it's really sad and unnecessary. thank you very much for being with us. i hope they are watching in washington. thank you. >> thank you. >> up next tonight on "hannity." >> i have to ask you a question you may not like to answer. this could be tough. >> oh, all right. >> it's an essay question. the qualities required of a president. vice president joe biden, former secretary of state hillary clinton. compare and contrast. >> all right, mr. thrill up his leg chris matthews of t-ball had a well rehearsed interview with his hero, his demi-god barack obama. of course they were playing softba softball. we'll have it after the break. and pastor rick war with ren opens up about the death of his son and his latest project. we want to hear from you. log onto share your thoughts on this and more. ha
, is that republicans among white married women tend to do very well. >> yes, but women have elected democratic presidents, there's been a big gender gap on the national level. women are so perplexing, if you call them sweetie, it turnings them off. if you try to minimize the crime of rape, it turns them off. maybe that's a lesson that everybody ought to learn. >> and just sort of think through what you're actually about to say. so i've got to thank you, thanks for coming by. and thanks for watching state of the union. fareed zakaria gps starts right now. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you live from new york. starting with nelson mandela and we will ask you what happened to his legacy in africa and beyond. i have a great panel including one of mandela's close confid t confidants and the man that until this summer was obama's top national security -- why he says the u.s. doesn't need to cut a deal with hamid karzai of afghanistan. >>> next, how to understand the booming american economy. i'
but not knowing quite how it was going to end, whether a bloodbath or an election. and then you had all these amazing characters. mandela first among them. and one of -- maybe a dirty little secret of south africa is that it has first world infrastructures. so unlike a lot of other places where you're covering upheaval and bloodshed, the airplanes fly on time. there are rental cars, well-paved highways, fast food joints, telephones that work, gas stations. you may be traveling to scenes that feel like the third world upheavals but you're doing it with a first world comfort level. >> how do you characterize his relationship with the foreign press over the years? did he seem to seek out that attention? was he aware of the benefits of bringing in foreign reporters? >> he was very shrewd about the press. i always had the sense that he knew exactly what he was doing, and you could see he was sort of gauging what he had to give and what he needed to do in each interview. if it was somebody who was sort of dropped in from the foreign world that just wanted to bathe in the presence of nelson ma
well. >> well, yes, but women have elected democratic presidents. there's been a big gender gap on the national level for the republican party. women so perplexing. if you call them sweetie, turns them off. if you joke about rape or minimize the crime of rape, it turns women off. >> it turns me off. >> exactly. maybe that's a lesson that everybody ought to learn. >> right. and just sort of think through what you're actually about to say. so i've got to thank you all here. mo, susan, ken, thanks for coming by. and thank you all for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. fareed zakaria gps starts right now. >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed ka czzaczar ya comin you live from new york. we'll start today's show with nelson mandela and we will ask what happened to his legacy in africa and beyond? i have a great panel including one of mandela's close kf dants. >>> then the man who until this summer was president obama's top adviser on national security, tom donnelly, on the ira
the election. he didn't just leave, circumstances change. the freedom of that change with global opinion. >> i was in college when he was freed, rick, and you have this sense, especially looking back historically, that he's released and all is well. and that was the opposite of actually what was the case. when chris hani was an anc leader, was murdered, that was a seminole moment. you talked about when then mandela goes to f.w. de klerk and says, you have to stop this or virtually everything will go off the rails. >> and he went on television in south africa that night rather than de klerk ask showed that he was the father of the nation. as you know, i was with him when his father was murdered. we were in kuno, had just taken an early morning walk, the phone rang and he picked it up and got the news. he was on the phone for about 15 minutes, his expression never changed. he put down the phone and turned to me with a little exasperation and said, man, where is our porridge? he was so calm in a crisis and then he rose to that. he said that was when south africa was on the knife edge of a civil w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)